Hiring Ads: Sign of strength in job market or weakness of informal networks?

There is an interesting post on hiring ads over at Global Robotics Innovation Park.  The post sources its data from Wanted Analytics’s post on hiring advertising for robotics.  The post headline is that robotics related hiring ads are up 29%.  This is good news, but I’m not sure that it is that significant a statement on the health of our industry.  It is more a statement on the health of our industry’s customers and the macro-economy at large.

If you look at the trend and the details that they report, it seems that most of these jobs are at users of robotics in manufacturing or medical hubs–not places with lots of robotics builders.  The need for a physician/urologist with robotics experience sounds a lot like hospitals are trying to keep those sweet new DaVinci Sis fully utilized.  A lot of the other jobs sound like manufacturing is finally finding its feet again.  Don’t get me wrong, this is all good for robotics, but it doesn’t mean that our industry is growing relative to the economy at large.  Take a look at the job posting numbers for robotics qualifications.

Job Postings for Robotics:

Wanted Analytics also has a similar post on the state of hiring for lean six sigma engineers with a headline about 28% growth.  The trend of the two graphs is almost identical.  This suggests to me that both the headlines should really be about the macro-economy and what that means for hiring.

Job Postings for Lean Six Sigma:

I think the takeaway from this jobs post is that as our industry continues to insert robotics into more areas of people’s lives, that the changes will not be in tech hubs where robots are designed and built.  Rather, the changes will be where the users live.  Our impact, for good or ill will be where our systems get used.  Adoption and sales are going to be driven by the challenges that our customers face.  As an industry we need to start addressing the challenges of the robotics workforce to remove that impediment to adoption.  ReThink Robotics is on the right track trying to reduce the hurdles to operating a robot.  Still, our society will probably require a lot of system operators and maintainers if more work is to be done by robotic systems.  The education system is unlikely to meet this challenge with out partners, I hope that our industry can be such a partner.

What cluster does a company with HQ in Boston but more offices in Silicon Valley belong to?

I’ve got more comprehensive data on public robotics companies due to some updates suggested over at hizook.  However, I’m at a loss as to how to classify Brooks Automation and Cognex.  They both make automation components for various kinds of industrial applications and they both have corporate HQ outside of Boston with two offices each (probably the legacy of acquisitions) in Silicon Valley.

At a loss as to how to classify them, I’ve made a new category for them on my charts.  If you have thoughts about how to get good acquisition data–especially as a lot robotics companies can be acquired in a transaction that is ‘immaterial’ to a 10-K/Q for public company–I’d love to hear them.

And here is the raw data.  Not all market caps were taken on the same day.

Surprise! Robotics Companies Are NOT Capital Intensive

Please allow me to blow your mind and overturn the common sense notion that robotics companies are capital intensive.  Comparing profitable, public, U.S. based robotics companies to a diverse basket of prominent public companies shows that robotics companies do not require a lot equipment and property to make successful businesses.

In fact, robotics companies have the least property plant and equipment of any of the companies I selected for comparison–which deliberately included such tech giants as a chip maker, an operating system maker, and a search engine giant.  Looking at capital expenditure and depreciation, the robotics companies are again among the leanest of the companies on the list.

The only companies that had such low numbers for CAPEX and depreciation had their assets tied up in very long term investments like real estate and aircraft manufacturing facilities.  Also, most of the robotics companies are still growing and may have their capital expenditures boosted as a percentage of revenues by their anticipated growth.  Take a look at the trend line.

Now what people may mean when they say that robotics is ‘capital intensive’ is that the marginal cost of goods sold for a robotics company is greater than $0/per unit that consumer web applications have–but if that’s what they mean they should come out and say it and not be sloppy in their reasoning.

Angels, VCs, and other investors are you paying attention?  Big plays are going to be made on relatively small bets.

As a Percentage of Revenue
Ticker

Company

PPE Depreciation

CAPEX

Robotics

IRBT

iRobot

6.81%

2.42%

3.05%

ISRG

Intuitive Surgical

11.31%

1.68%

6.79%

AVAV

Aerovironment

7.24%

2.76%

4.61%

CGNX

Cognex

9.86%

1.72%

2.43%

Robotics Median

8.55%

2.07%

3.83%

Robotics Average

8.80%

2.14%

4.22%

Diversified

GOOG

Google

25.33%

3.68%

9.07%

MSFT

Microsoft

11.67%

3.95%

3.37%

T

AT&T

84.50%

14.50%

15.87%

INTC

Intel

43.75%

9.52%

19.93%

XOM

ExxonMobil

45.96%

3.34%

6.63%

BA

Boeing

13.55%

2.12%

2.36%

D

Dominion Resources

206.34%

8.96%

25.40%

AA

Alcoa

77.82%

5.94%

5.16%

DIS

Disney

38.99%

4.50%

7.32%

HD

Home Depot

34.54%

2.39%

1.65%

Diversified Median

41.37%

4.23%

6.98%

Diversified Average

58.25%

5.89%

9.68%

Some notes on the analysis:

-Data comes from the companies last 10-K filing.  Some companies include different things in revenue (where possible I tried to exclude revenue from a financing arm), in deprecation (some include amortization of intangible assets), and capital expenditure (Intuitive, for example, includes the acquisition of intangible assets).

-I wanted to look at a diverse basket of public companies and tried to pick companies that might be similar in some ways to robotics companies but whose earnings would not be unduly influenced by robotic related income.  For example, I excluded offshore oil field services companies because they were too close to being robotics companies, but still not pure enough to get a good view of the diversified company.  I did include Disney (which does anamatronics), Boeing (which has a UAV making subsidiary), and Google (which has a robotic car division) because I thought the revenues contributed to the these companies by robotics related activities had no material impact on the financial metrics.  However, their tangential involvement in robotics speaks to their similarity to robotics businesses.

-Future analysis should look at some other places where capital use can be buried.  For example, Cost of Goods Sold can hide capital that is employed on the companies behalf further up the supply chain.  It is possible that current assets like inventory may also need to be higher for robotics companies.  Also, we should compare total assets and liabilities to the revenue generated to similarly sized public companies to see if there is a substantial difference.

East Coast Chauvinism in Robotics: Time to Face Facts, Silicon Valley is Kicking Our Ass

A cleaned-up version of this article became my first post on Hizook.  http://www.hizook.com/blog/2012/06/25/east-coast-chauvinism-robotics-time-face-facts-silicon-valley-kicking-our-butt#comment-971

_______

I have lots of love for Pittsburgh in particular, but it really pisses me off when people on the East Coast repeat a bunch of falsehoods (See #8) about how Boston and Pittsburgh compare to Silicon Valley and the rest of the world.  Many people in Pittsburgh and Boston—including people I call friends and mentors—smugly think that the MIT and CMU centered robotics clusters are leading the world in robotics.  This is demonstrably false.

If leadership in robotics means forming companies, making money, or employing people, then Silicon Valley is crushing everyone—no matter what the Wall Street Journal editorial page says about their business climate.  I’ve previously published an analysis of the Hizook 2011 VC Funding in Robotics data that shows that the Valley gets 49% of total VC robotics investment worldwide.

I’d now like to add an analysis of U.S. public companies (see bottom of the page).  Basically, the ‘Pittsburgh and Boston are the center of the robotics world’ story is even more ridiculous if you look at where public robotics companies are located.  Silicon Valley is crushing the other clusters in the U.S. at creating value in robotics and in building a robotics workforce in public companies.  (A forthcoming analysis will show that this true worldwide and if you include robotics divisions of public companies not principally engaged in robotics such as Boeing and Textron.)

77% of the workforce at public robotics pure plays is in Silicon Valley companies.  An astounding 93% of the market capitalization is headquartered in Silicon Valley and even if you exclude Intuitive Surgical (NASDAQ:ISRG) as an outlier, the Silicon Valley cluster still has twice as much market capitalization as Boston.

The public companies that I deemed to meet the criteria of being principally engaged in robotics, that they had to make and sell a robot, and not have substantial value creating revenues from businesses not related to robotics are listed in the table below.

The one company that I believe might be controversial for being excluded from this list is Cognex (NASDAQ:CGNX).  However, while trying to do decide on whether to include them, I found their list of locations.  They have three locations in California including two in Silicon Valley.  That means that this ‘Boston’ company has more offices in Silicon Valley than in Boston.  I’m not an advanced (or motivated) enough analyst to find out what the exact employee breakdown is, but combined with the fact that they make vision systems and supply components rather than robots, I elected to exclude them. I acknowledge that a similar case could be made about Adept (NASDAQ:ADEP) that just made a New Hampshire acquisition, but I have decided to include them and count them towards Silicon Valley.   I do not believe that either of these decisions, substantively impact my finding that Silicon Valley is the leading cluster when it comes to public company workforce and value creation.

I’m hoping the people who are spreading the misinformation that Silicon Valley has to catch-up to Boston and Pittsburgh will publish corrections.  I believe that this is important, particularly because I want to see Pittsburgh reclaim its early lead in robotics.  So many robotic inventions can trace their heritage back to Pittsburgh, it is a real shame that Pittsburgh has not used this strength to create the kind of robotics business ecosystem that one would hope.

It is impossible for communities to take appropriate action if they do not understand where they stand.  I hope that this new data will inspire the Pittsburgh community to come together and address the challenges of culture, customer access, and capital availability that have been inhibiting the growth of Pittsburgh’s robotic ecosystem before they lose too many more aspiring young entrepreneurs—such as me—to the siren song of California.

Company (1) Ticker Employees (2) Market Cap $M (3) % of Employees % of Market Cap Robotics Cluster
Accuray NASDAQ:ARAY

                   1,100

  463

20%

2%

SV
Adept NASDAQ:ADEP

                       183

43

3%

0%

SV
Aerovironment NASDAQ:AVAV

                       768

  577

14%

2%

SV
Hansen NASDAQ:HNSN

                       174

 135

3%

1%

SV
Intuitive Surgical NASDAQ:ISRG

                   1,924

  21,840

36%

88%

SV
iRobot NASDAQ:IRBT

                       619

  606

12%

2%

BOS
MAKO Surgical NASDAQ:MAKO

                       429

  1,110

8%

4%

Other
Stereotaxis Inc. NASDAQ:STXS

                       171

 13

3%

0%

Other
Total

                   5,368

24,787

100%

100%

(1) Companies are U.S. public companies that have been identified by Frank Tobe’s or my own research as principally engaged in robotics
(2) Employee Count as of Last 10-K Filing
(3) Market Capitalization as of 6/24/2012

Consumer Driven Supply Chain

The press is starting to take an interest in having a supply chain truly driven by consumers.  Perhaps, they already inhabit a market that is much closer to this ideal than those of us who make physical products.  With information becoming increasingly available and inventories and batch sizes falling, the completely custom, consumer-driven supply chain is coming.

http://www.outsideonline.com/blog/hackers-look-to-outdoor-gearheads-for-inspiration.html

Oh yeah, and I get quoted.

Who is on the federal dole in robotics? Texas?!!

I just posted my rankings for federal support of the robotics/unmanned systems industry in each of the three clusters.  What was really striking is how if you are in defense robotics, you actually probably don’t want to be in one of the clusters, but in the DC/MD/VA area–no surprise there.  However, if you want to win big in space robotics contracting you want to be in Texas.  Their space contracts that hit the search term robotic are about equal to everyone else’s robotic and unmanned contracts put together.  That’s pretty rich considering who the Great State of Texas send to D.C. and their fondness for research funding.

Off my soapbox, I’m going to call this one for Boston between the clusters.  They have done the best at least according to this crude metric, but as I note in my comments on the cluster summary, I would be willing to revise my methodology for comparing government investment if someone can propose a better method.  I would be particularly interested in focusing on basic research grants.  Comments public or private are welcome.

Needless Deaths

Fire season has just begun this year and already there have been two needless deaths that can be attributed to the FAA and Forest Service’s failure to embrace unmanned and robotic technology.  There is absolutely nothing about the fire reconnaissance mission or the tanker mission that cannot be done better, cheaper, and more safely by an unmanned aircraft.  These men did not need to be in that plane.

The crazy thing about it is that the Forest Service/BLM incident commanders are some of the few people in North America that can actually tell the FAA to go pound sand.  They get to put up a TFR (Temporary Flight Restriction) over their fire and they control all air traffic in the TFR.  Wildfire response crews do not do any night operations because it is considered too dangerous for them to fly at night.  Still, the powers that be have not allowed unmanned aircraft to play a substantial role in firefighting despite successful demonstrations in 2008.

My most sincere condolences to the families of these men.   They are exactly the kind of people that we need more of in society–people that will take risks to protect us all.  We–as a country and a society–are literally killing these people with our failure to embrace unmanned and robotic technologies.  I don’t want to be unsympathetic to the difficulties of change in government organizations and the good work that I’m sure the employees at Forest Service and BLM are doing, but when we’re making widows and orphans with our crappy policy, we all need to step up to the plate to take action to change it.

If I were the U.S. Congress I would:

1)   Call in the FAA, Forest Service, and BLM and tear them all a new one for their foot dragging on unmanned aircraft.

2)  Mandate the conversion of the whole tanker and most of the fire reconnaissance fleet to unmanned aircraft within 5 years.

3)  Direct the Forest Service and BLM to provide unmanned aircraft support at night in the TFRs to incident commanders this fire season.

4)  Give the BLM and the Forest Service some money to do this.  One of the main problems with wildfire firefighting is that there is a negligible advance procurement budget, but a nearly unlimited budget for reimbursement of labor to fight fires.  This is not a good deal for the country, spend a little bit in advance and lets save lives and money next fire season and every season thereafter.